Word-Of-the-Week #724: Helpful

June 21, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Helpful – giving & supportive. 

Do you work for a company that is giving and supportive? How much emphasis is placed on learning and growing? How would your co-workers rate you on being helpful?

This is part 2 of the Scott Mautz article, Now That I’m 50, Here’s What I’ve Learned About Achieving Success That Escaped Me at 25. Hitting the big fifty requires reflection almost as a duty. So I focused mine on what I’ve learned about success since being half my current age.”

To recap he wrote, ““I like writing about timeless lessons for success or key behaviors that lead to success. I’ve even written about famous failures that will inspire you to success. But nothing has spurned a more introspective look at achieving success than my turning a half-century old.  (Ugh, it hurts to even write those words). I now realize how much I’ve learned compared to when I was half my age.

  1. Zap, don’t sap.

Success is drawn to those who zap energy into a workplace with their enthusiasm, passion, and optimism and repelled by those who sap energy with their pessimism, gossip, and negative attitude. Don’t get sucked into the vortex of energy-sucking vampires.

  1. Character reveals itself in times of crisis.

So use such times to show yours.

Success is forged in times of adversity and crisis. It’s easy to be awesome when things are going great. But when the chips are down, how will you show up? And people will remember how you acted in such times, one way or another. One of my greatest career regrets came from an impression I left during a time of crisis where I was lashing out and blaming co-workers. They didn’t forget my reaction, and I never will either.

  1. Lift as you climb.

Rising up the chain is nice. Lifting others up as you do so, with the intent to go beyond success to significance (for the impact you have on others), is better. The position you gain should be used not just to further your own, but to help others improve theirs.

And by the way, success comes back to you when you focus on helping others achieve it.

  1. The only comparison that matters is to who you were yesterday.

Constant comparison to others is the surest way to undermine your success (and make you miserable). Relatedly, will you go from being to becoming–becoming a better version of yourself–versus just living “as-is” in your life?

To do so, place learning and growth on a pedestal. I think back now to the times in my career when I was least happy and I can tell you with great clarity, it was when I wasn’t learning and growing.”

This week’s focus is on being giving and supportive. Do you zap energy into your workplace with enthusiasm, passion, and optimism? How willing are you to help others achieve success? How well do you deal with adversity or a crisis?

I LOVE feedback! Join my Facebook community on my FUN-damentals Fan Page.

Word-Of-the-Week #723: Success

June 14, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Success –achieving something desired, planned or attempted. 

How often have you felt you achieved success in your life? Do you give yourself credit for attempting something even if it doesn’t turn out the way you expected? Are you clear on what you want out of life?

This week Scott Mautz shares, Now That I’m 50, Here’s What I’ve Learned About Achieving Success That Escaped Me at 25. Hitting the big fifty requires reflection almost as a duty. So I focused mine on what I’ve learned about success since being half my current age.”

“I like writing about timeless lessons for success or key behaviors that lead to success. I’ve even written about famous failures that will inspire you to success. But nothing has spurned a more introspective look at achieving success than my turning a half-century old.  (Ugh, it hurts to even write those words). I now realize how much I’ve learned compared to when I was half my age.

So, this column is addressed to the 25-year-old me to whom I say, “Hey! Turn off your Sony Walkman and shift your attention from the Counting Crows to this success advice!”

  1. You own your career.

When I joined a big company shortly after turning 25, I believed that the Great Career Planner in the sky would simply move me from job to job until my career dreams were fully realized.

I was doing too much assuming and not enough asserting.

Don’t fall into this trap. Yes, you’ll get help along the way, but you’re in the driver’s seat. Be clear on what you want and proactive in making it so. Regarding being clear on what you want, see the next point.

  1. Meaning starts with “me.”

You’re the only one who can ascribe meaning (or not) to what you spend your time on. Pursue the life and career that you want, not that someone else expects of you. The word “meaning” starts with “me” for a reason. This is the key to having a truly meaningful, fulfilling career–and life.

Bronnie Ware (a palliative nurse) captured the misgivings of the dying in her book The Top 5 Regrets of the Dying. Number one on the list of regrets?  “I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.”

  1. Seek authenticity, not approval.

This directly relates to number two. When we seek approval we’re seeking external validation, which is an empty victory at best and elusive and confidence eroding at worst. If approval equals success for you, know it’s a never-ending quest. Instead, let a desire to serve your authentic self drive your actions.

  1. Know that your definition of success will change.

25 years ago it was all about getting promoted as often and fast as possible. Now, it’s about serving something greater than myself as broadly and deeply as possible. I didn’t see that coming.”

This week’s focus is on success. Has your definition of success changed over the years? Are you focusing on your desires or someone else’s? Do you feel you have a truly meaningful, fulfilling career–and life?

I LOVE feedback! Join my Facebook community on my FUN-damentals Fan Page.

 

Word-Of-the-Week #722: Compulsory

June 7, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Compulsory – absolutely required & mandatory. 

How many things do you deal with on a daily basis that is absolutely mandatory? When people tell me to “Have a nice day” my response is always “It’s pretty much compulsory!” Always causes a smile and most times gets a laugh.

Steve Strauss, author of STEVE’S 3-MINUTE COACHING, once again has great insight to share.

“Quote: Fun

(Quotes are capsules of information, reinforcement or enlightenment.)

“People rarely succeed unless they have fun at what they are doing.” – Dale Carnegie

Coaching Point: I frequently come across people who believe they must strive, struggle, stress, effort, or suffer to achieve outcomes. When quizzed about their approach to life they say it’s the model they learned long ago. Pressed further they report it’s “always” been that way. In other words, they got imprinted with the struggle model before they had a chance to choose. They are being run by their 3-year old self! 

On the other hand, happy highly successful people talk of enjoying what they do and almost chuckle at being paid for it. Furthermore, many have lectured me (gently, lovingly, but pointedly) that it is insane to believe that a journey which is not fun can lead to an outcome which is. 

Do you have fun at what you are doing?”

And speaking of FUN, Memorial Day is the official start of summer. Are you taking a vacation? Have you started planning? If not, just remember…it’s COMPULSORY!

Oh yeah, “And Have a Nice Day!”

I LOVE feedback! Join my Facebook community on my FUN-damentals Fan Page.

Word-Of-the-Week #721: Prescient

May 31, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Prescient – perceiving the significance of events before they occur; psychic. 

How do you react when things don’t work out the way you expected? Do you get angry? Or are you able to “roll with the punches” and come up with Plan B?

This week Bill Marvin, The Restaurant Doctor shares more perspective on dealing with the unexpected.

“In one of my more prescient moments, it hit me: Things always work out for the best, they just seldom work out the way we thought they would. Author Richard Bach put it better [of course] when he said, “What the caterpillar calls the end of the world the master calls a butterfly.”

Looking back on the rather convoluted path of my life, I can recount countless examples of the truth of this notion — events that seemed like the end of the world at the time but which caused me to take a path I never intended, one that has made all the difference.

The most recent example is the “septic incident” that befell us on Easter Sunday, just a month before our house was scheduled to go on the market. It has been crazy around here recovering from all that, but it looks like we will, in fact, have the house back together and ready to go on schedule … with a re-designed septic system and a lower level sporting fresh paint, new carpeting, upgraded countertops, new tile and a nice new shower.

Aside from eating the deductible, what’s not to like about THAT?

An old mentor of mine once remarked that life appears to be a series of things to handle. That observation has a deeply simple wisdom to it. You do what you do, you get what you get, you deal with what comes up and move on to the next adventure.

How do you react when things don’t work out the way you expected? Do you get angry? Do you blame others? Do you make excuses? Do you feel guilty? All those responses, however human they may be, are a total waste of time an energy. They may make you feel like you’re doing something about the situation, but don’t fool yourself — these reactions do nothing to correct the situation and often just make it worse.

When stuff happens — and stuff will ALWAYS happen — notice it, handle it and press ahead. When you’re back on track it may be worthwhile to look at how you might avoid the same negative outcome in the future, but first get it handled….competently and without a lot of drama.

[As an aside, two days ago my computer suddenly stopped recognizing my main data drive — the one with all my graphics, documents, photos and the like. I’ll be interested to learn what the hidden blessing in THAT will be!]”

This week’s focus is on being prescient. Have you ever had a premonition that turned out to be true? Do you believe that things always work out for the best? What unexpected lessons have you learned?

I LOVE feedback! Join my Facebook community on my FUN-damentals Fan Page.

Word-Of-the-Week #720: Expected

May 24, 2018 by · Comments Off on Word-Of-the-Week #720: Expected 

Expected likely or probable to happen. 

When was the last time something you expected to happen didn’t turn out the way you thought it would? How did you deal with it? How good are you with handling the “speed bumps” of life?

This week long time friend Bill Marvin, The Restaurant Doctor, shares his perspective on dealing with the unexpected. He writes, “Lately my full-time job has been getting the house ready to put on the market at the end of the month. It’s a big house and we’ve been here since 2000, so we’re talking about some major de-cluttering and staging decisions. 

Late April/early May is a firm deadline to list the house since we head to Portugal the first week of May to scout potential spots for our next chapter. It was all going smoothly, but we we hit a speed bump last Sunday when a “septic incident” flooded most of our lower level. Happy Easter! 

Now the project has morphed into dealing with water remediation techs, septic re-designers, insurance claims and contractor negotiations. Half the house looks like a bomb went off. With luck, we’ll still be able to get the house repaired and staged by our deadline … but it will be a photo finish. Wish us luck. 

I hope you never have to deal with an issue like this, but don’t think it could never happen. Let’s say a drain backed up in the middle of the night and wasn’t discovered until the morning shift arrived to find an inch of sewage-laden water covering the kitchen and dining room floors. You will have to close for weeks to get the problem resolved, do the repairs and get the appropriate agencies to certify you to serve food again. 

Do you know who to call and what to do? Do you have adequate insurance coverage? [Hint: check the amount of your deductible before you have to make a claim!] How will you handle things with your staff? What will you tell your guests?  

It might be worth making a few phone calls NOW … while you have time to do the research. It might be worth checking your store rooms and walk-ins to be sure no food items are stored on the floor. It might be worth staying on top of the regular maintenance of your restrooms and drainage systems. 

Just sayin’ …”

While his post is directed to the Hospitality Industry his points are very valid for anyone who owns property. And this week we are heading to our grandson’s graduation. We turned the irrigation on Saturday because it was so hot over the past week and guess what we found on Sunday? A big pile of mud in our fire pit seating area and a big busted pipe. My first thought was “Thank goodness we turned it on before we left. Otherwise we would have had a bigger mess when we got back home.” 

This week’s focus is when the expected doesn’t happen.  How do you feel when the expected doesn’t happen? Are you prepared to handle whatever comes along? Have you ever had to use a backup plan?

I LOVE feedback! Join my Facebook community on my FUN-damentals Fan Page.

Next Page »