Word-Of-the-Week #727: Achievers

July 12, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Achievers – one’s successful in accomplishing their goals.

Did you know that only 8 percent of people actually achieve their goals? Do you write down your goals? How specific and challenging are they?

This week features Marcel Schwantes, Inc. Union Tribune article, “Getting to the Goal: Here’s how achievers do it.”

“According to the University of Scranton, a whopping 92 percent of people who set New Year’s goals never actually achieve them. You can count me in that group. Failing to meet goals is pretty frustrating and can set you back.

That leaves 8 percent of us in a very elite category of goal-achievers. What do they do differently that 92 percent of us are missing out on? Most of the time, it comes down to simple habits to keep us accountable.

  1. They begin with the end in mind.

When setting goals, you have to know where you’re headed. When writing down your goals, make sure that you understand the path to your final destination. After all, a goal without a clear roadmap is just a pipe dream. Once you have your goal on paper, write out what you’ll need to get there. These are your subgoals and the resources that you will need to support you along the way.

  1. They build a support system around them.

High performers and productive people don’t do it alone. They understand that they can achieve more and do it quicker with the help of a mentor, coach, or adviser (or advisory team). If you wanted to get better at tennis, you would probably hire an instructor who would help you improve your serve or backhand volley. Setting and meeting larger goals is no different. Look for allies and build a network of experts who care about your success and keep you heading toward your goals. Meet with them regularly, seek their wisdom, ask for advice, and listen carefully.

  1. They set specific and challenging goals.

Research by Edwin Locke and Gary Latham found that when people followed these two principles (specific and challenging goals), it led to higher performance 90 percent of the time. For example, if your goal is to lose 30 pounds by the end of the year, it may be challenging, but it’s too vague and not specific enough. Try this instead: “During the month of July, I will lose five pounds by reducing sugar, breads, and soda. I will also walk briskly for 20 minutes daily.” When you have that much clarity around your goal, your chances of hitting the mark increase dramatically.”

And I was taught to use present tense. So on July 1st I would say, “I briskly walk everyday for 20 minutes and I lost 5 pounds because I cut back on sugar, bread & soda.”

This week’s all about being an achiever. Do you have a clear roadmap for accomplishing your goal? Do you have a support system of mentors or advisers to help you? Is your goal challenging and have you made it clear and specific?

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Word-Of-the-Week #726: Portentous

July 5, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Portentous – full of unspecifiable significance; exciting wonder and awe. 

When was the last time you experienced exciting wonder and awe? Could you enjoy something that was full of unspecifiable significance?

I am hoping you had a FUN 4th of July and are taking time to enjoy summer! This week’s word was inspired by our 3 week road trip we took in May.

We drove 3675 miles through Arizona, Utah, Wyoming, & Colorado. And we definitely overdosed on Vitamin N. Do you remember the WOW when I posed this question, “Are you suffering from nature deficit disorder?”

Our increasingly urban lifestyles are denying us the benefits of the great outdoors, says bestselling author Richard Louv. His book “Vitamin N: The Essential Guide to a Nature-Rich Life” is all about tempting us back outside. He focuses on 500 ways people can boost their engagement with nature.” 

Well I don’t have to be tempted. I LOVE being in nature! And this trip was all about seeing places that I had never seen before but always wanted to. After spending a week in Northern Arizona and Southeast Utah we headed up to Jackson Hole. On the way we stopped in Jensen, UT to see Dinosaur National Monument. Did you know that all of the dinosaurs that are on display in our museums came from Dinosaur National Park? It covers over 200,000 acres in Utah & Colorado. It was truly “awesome” to be able to see and touch the bones in the quarry.

  • We started our 4 day Grand Teton & Yellowstone Safari with a full rainbow…

…that I saw as an omen of what was to come.

  • Then at the end of our trip in Mesmerizing Monument Valley…

…we got a full moon rising over the desert…

…and felt the Ancestral spirits…

…with the chanting and meditative music.

  • It was beyond beautiful…

…& spectacular to say the least!

This week’s focus is finding exciting wonder and awe. The only side effects of overdosing on Vitamin N are taking your breath away and possible gasping. It’s really FUN…trust me! Where do you want to go? What do you want to see that could create a portentous experience for you?

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And you can see more trip pixs or our daily trip highlights here.

 

Word-Of-the-Week #725: Impact

June 28, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Impact – having a strong effect on, influence. 

Have you had an influence on anyone at work? Who have you had a strong effect on in your personal life? How important is it to you to leave a legacy?

This is part 3 of the Scott Mautz article, Now That I’m 50, Here’s What I’ve Learned About Achieving Success That Escaped Me at 25. Hitting the big fifty requires reflection almost as a duty. So I focused mine on what I’ve learned about success since being half my current age.”

To recap he wrote, ““I like writing about timeless lessons for success or key behaviors that lead to success. I’ve even written about famous failures that will inspire you to success. But nothing has spurned a more introspective look at achieving success than my turning a half-century old.  (Ugh, it hurts to even write those words). I now realize how much I’ve learned compared to when I was half my age.

  1. You own your career.
  2. Meaning starts with “me.”
  3. Seek authenticity, not approval.
  4. Know that your definition of success will change.
  5. Zap, don’t sap.
  6. Character reveals itself in times of crisis.
  7. Lift as you climb.
  8. The only comparison that matters is to who you were yesterday.
  9. The biggest risk you can take is not taking any risk.

The Navy’s first female Rear Admiral, Grace Murray Hopper, once said “Ships in port are safe. But that’s not what ships are made for.”  I’ve so often seen that success depends on the willingness to take risks, learn from them, and keep moving forward.

  1. Actually, there is a substitute for hard work.

And that substitute is consistent, relentless, hard work (sorry I tricked you there). There’s no other way to success. Period. And when you throw in dashes of patience and resilience and cook it all in the oven of life, you get fresh-baked fortitude.

I’ll place my bet on someone with fortitude over a “quick-path-to-success-plan” every single time.

  1. Leave politics for the politicians.

Do your job to the best of your ability and leave the politics for those with less ability.  Sometimes, yes, politics will pay off for someone else in their career. But not over the long run–karma is a you-know-what. And do you want to advance in that fashion anyway?

  1. Leave a legacy.

I’ve been successful in many roles in my career because I started with the mindset of, “How am I going to leave a legacy in my time during this role? What will be my immutable impact?” So before you dive in and start executing in your next role, ask this of yourself first.

  • My hope is that each of these lessons looking back helps you moving forward.

Now, where did I put my vinyl of Pearl Jam’s Ten?”

This week’s focus is on impact. Are you willing to take a risk? Would you say you work hard and do your best every day? What immutable impact do you want to be remembered for?

I LOVE feedback! Join my Facebook community on my FUN-damentals Fan Page.

Word-Of-the-Week #724: Helpful

June 21, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Helpful – giving & supportive. 

Do you work for a company that is giving and supportive? How much emphasis is placed on learning and growing? How would your co-workers rate you on being helpful?

This is part 2 of the Scott Mautz article, Now That I’m 50, Here’s What I’ve Learned About Achieving Success That Escaped Me at 25. Hitting the big fifty requires reflection almost as a duty. So I focused mine on what I’ve learned about success since being half my current age.”

To recap he wrote, ““I like writing about timeless lessons for success or key behaviors that lead to success. I’ve even written about famous failures that will inspire you to success. But nothing has spurned a more introspective look at achieving success than my turning a half-century old.  (Ugh, it hurts to even write those words). I now realize how much I’ve learned compared to when I was half my age.

  1. Zap, don’t sap.

Success is drawn to those who zap energy into a workplace with their enthusiasm, passion, and optimism and repelled by those who sap energy with their pessimism, gossip, and negative attitude. Don’t get sucked into the vortex of energy-sucking vampires.

  1. Character reveals itself in times of crisis.

So use such times to show yours.

Success is forged in times of adversity and crisis. It’s easy to be awesome when things are going great. But when the chips are down, how will you show up? And people will remember how you acted in such times, one way or another. One of my greatest career regrets came from an impression I left during a time of crisis where I was lashing out and blaming co-workers. They didn’t forget my reaction, and I never will either.

  1. Lift as you climb.

Rising up the chain is nice. Lifting others up as you do so, with the intent to go beyond success to significance (for the impact you have on others), is better. The position you gain should be used not just to further your own, but to help others improve theirs.

And by the way, success comes back to you when you focus on helping others achieve it.

  1. The only comparison that matters is to who you were yesterday.

Constant comparison to others is the surest way to undermine your success (and make you miserable). Relatedly, will you go from being to becoming–becoming a better version of yourself–versus just living “as-is” in your life?

To do so, place learning and growth on a pedestal. I think back now to the times in my career when I was least happy and I can tell you with great clarity, it was when I wasn’t learning and growing.”

This week’s focus is on being giving and supportive. Do you zap energy into your workplace with enthusiasm, passion, and optimism? How willing are you to help others achieve success? How well do you deal with adversity or a crisis?

I LOVE feedback! Join my Facebook community on my FUN-damentals Fan Page.

FUN-video: Wild West Adventure Movie Trailer

June 20, 2018 by · 2 Comments 

 

 

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