Word Of the Week #599: Potential

January 27, 2016 by · Comments Off on Word Of the Week #599: Potential 

Potentialhaving the capacity to become or develop into something in the future.

Do you want to achieve more at work? Do you know what motivates you to perform at your best? How about the people you work with and live with?

This week we follow up on Jennifer Davies article in the San Diego UT Business section titled, “The bottom line on emotional intelligence.”

To recap: Trevor Blair, director of executive search for Manpower San Diego, a local employment agency, says, “Some business types continue to think of EQ as some fluffy, new-age mumbo that has no place in a fast-paced company fighting to survive in a competitive marketplace, the smart companies are realizing its true value.

The fact is no leader can reach their potential with it.

In order to understand other people and what motivates them to perform at their best, you first have to understand yourself.”

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But EQ can be about more than leadership potential.

It can also translate into real dollars according to Travis Bradberry, the author of Emotional Intelligence 2.0.

“People with a high degree of emotional intelligence make more money – an average of $29,000 more per year than people with a low degree of emotional intelligence,” he writes.

“The link between emotional intelligence and earnings is so direct that every point increase in emotional intelligence adds $1,300 to an annual salary.”

The good news is that unlike IQ – which is considered to be static and unchangeable no matter how much you study or work to improve it – emotional intelligence can be boosted.

This week’s focus is on reaching your potential. Would you like to achieve more of a leadership role at work? Would you like to make more money? Would you like to know how to improve and boost your Emotional Intelligence?

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Word Of the Week #598: Savvy

January 20, 2016 by · Comments Off on Word Of the Week #598: Savvy 

Savvyhaving or showing a clever awareness and resourcefulness; common sense.

How would you rate yourself on being savvy? How aware are you of your thoughts and feelings? How astute are you at sizing up situations at home and work?

Jennifer Davies, the assistant dean of external affairs for UCSD, contributes to the San Diego UT Business section. “The bottom line on emotional intelligence” is this week’s feature.

She writes. “You may be smart, but that may not be enough in today’s job market.

More companies are looking for those who are emotionally savvy as well.

Trevor Blair, director of executive search for Manpower San Diego, a local employment agency, said the importance of a high EQ, also known as emotional intelligence, cannot be understated, especially for “knowledge workers, millennials and members of the creative class, who simply don’t respond to old-school methods of motivation in the workplace.”

But what exactly is emotional intelligence?a savvy

Travis Bradberry, the author of Emotional Intelligence 2.0, has described it this way: “Emotional intelligence is the ‘something’ in each of us that is a bit intangible. It affects how we manage behavior, navigate social complexities and make personal decisions that achieve positive results.”

What’s even more interesting according to Bradberry, is that EQ might be more important than IQ – or intelligent quotient – as studies have found that “people with average IQs outperform those with the highest IQs 70 percent of the time.”

While Blair said some business types continue to think of EQ as some “fluffy, new-age mumbo that has no place in a fast-paced company fighting to survive in a competitive marketplace,” the smart companies are realizing its true value.

“The fact is no leader can reach their potential with it,” he said

This week’s focus is having more savvy. Would you like to achieve more positive results when you make personal decisions? How well are you at navigating social complexities and reading the feelings of others? Would you like to reach your full potential at work?

Stay tuned! In the next several weeks we’ll have more tips on how to boost your EQ.

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Word Of the Week #530: Relationship

October 2, 2014 by · Comments Off on Word Of the Week #530: Relationship 

Relationship a state of connectedness between people (especially an emotional connection).

How well do you handle relationships at work? How good are you at reading your co-workers or staffs reactions or feelings? Would you say you are good at dealing with disputes?

This is the follow up to last week’s WOW and the final one from Daniel Goleman’s book on Emotional Intelligence. The 5th key quality needed is social or interpersonal intelligence. It is the ability to handle relationships, which in large part is, the ability to manage the emotions of others.

He writes, “Social intelligence allows us to connect with people quite smoothly, be astute about reading their reactions and feelings, lead and organize, and handle the disputes that are bound to flare up in any human activity.

The Four Components are:

  • Organizing Groups – the essential skill of the leader, this involves initiating and coordination the efforts of a network of people. This is the talent seen in theater directors or producers, in military officers, and in effective heads organizations and units of all kinds.

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  • Negotiating Solutions – the talent of the mediator, preventing conflicts or resolving those that flare up. People who have this ability excel in deal making, arbitrating or mediating disputes; they might have a career in diplomacy, in law, or as middlemen or mangers of takeovers.
  • Personal Connection – the art of relationship, easy to enter into an encounter or to recognize and respond fittingly to people’s feelings and concerns. Such people make good “team players,” dependable spouses, good friends or business partners; in the business world they do well as salespeople or managers, or can be excellent teachers.
  • Social Analysis – being able to detect and have insights about people’s feelings, motives, and concerns. This knowledge of how others feel can lead to an easy intimacy or sense of rapport.

These people are the natural leaders and are the kind of people others like to be with because they are emotionally nourishing – they leave other people in a good mood, and evoke the comment, “What a pleasure to be around someone like that.”

This week’s focus is on your relationships. Would you say you are a good team player? Are you a natural leader? How good are you at negotiating solutions? Do you easily connect with people you meet? Are you a pleasure to be around?

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Word Of the Week #529: Empathy

September 25, 2014 by · Comments Off on Word Of the Week #529: Empathy 

Empathy understanding and identifying with another person’s situation, feelings, thoughts, etc.

Is it easy or hard for you to show emotion? How good are you at recognizing emotions in others? Did you know that the 90% or more of an emotional message is nonverbal?

In Daniel Goleman’s book on Emotional Intelligence he identifies 5 key qualities needed. I have covered 3 of them in several of the past WOW’s. They are self-awareness, self-management and self-motivation. Today I will cover the 4th and that is the ability to recognize emotions in others.

He writes, “Empathy builds on self-awareness; the more open we are to our own emotions, the more skilled we will be in a empathyreading feelings. People who have no idea what they feel themselves, are at a complete loss when it comes to knowing what anyone else around them is feeling. For all rapport, the root of caring, stems from emotional attunement, from the capacity for empathy.

The key to intuiting another’s feelings is in the ability to read nonverbal channels: tone of voice, gesture, facial expression, and the like. In tests with over 7,000 people the benefits of being able to read feelings from nonverbal cues included being better adjusted emotionally, more popular, more outgoing, and – perhaps not surprisingly – more sensitive. In general, women are better than men at this kind of empathy.

The roots of morality are to be found in empathy, since it is empathizing with – someone in pain, danger, or deprivation, say – and so sharing their distress that moves people to act to help them. By putting oneself in another’s place, leads people to follow certain moral principles.

This week’s focus is on empathy. Would you like to be more popular? How comfortable are you with showing your emotions? How good are you at reading other people’s feelings? How about identifying with another person’s situation?

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Word Of the Week #528: Optimism

September 18, 2014 by · Comments Off on Word Of the Week #528: Optimism 

Optimism the best possible or conceivable condition.

Do you generally feel optimistic about your life? Do you see failure as “just a setback” or a road block that you have to get around? Or does failure make you feel helpless?

This is the last trait on self-motivation from Daniel Goleman’s book on Emotional Intelligence. He says, “Consider the role of positive motivation – the marshalling of feelings of enthusiasm, zeal, and confidence – in achievement. Studies of Olympic athletes, world-class musicians, and chess grand masters find their unifying trait is the ability to motivate themselves to pursue relentless training routines.

Optimism, like hope, means having a strong expectation that, in general, things will turn out all right in life, despite setbacks and frustrations. From a optimismthe stand point of emotional intelligence, optimism is an attitude that buffers people against falling into apathy, hopelessness, or depression in the face of tough going. And as with hope, its near cousin, optimism pays dividends in life (providing, of course, it is a realistic optimism: a too-naïve optimism can be disastrous.)

Dr. Martin Seligman, the author of “Learned Optimism,” says “Success comes down to a combination of reasonable talent with the ability to keep going in the face of defeat.”

For his research Dr. Seligman chose Met Life insurance salesmen since they must constantly rebound from getting the door slammed in their face. He discovered that in the first two years on the job, salesmen who scored high for optimism sold 37% more than their pessimistic brethren.

Then he tried another experiment: Applicants who were optimists but who failed to meet Met Life’s other standard test criteria were hired anyway. This group outsold its pessimistic counterparts by 21% in the first year and by 57% the next.

If you have experienced my Fun-damentals of Emotion Intelligence program, then you know it’s your IQ that gets you hired and your EQ that gets you promoted. Your ability to motivate yourself and stay motivated is one of the key elements of emotional intelligence. Optimism and hope fall under self-motivation!

This week focus on being more optimistic. Look at everything as an opportunity, even though it may seem negative at the time. What would you have to do to have the best possible or conceivable condition? How would it feel to know that a setback is just that and not permanent?

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